Bald Eagle Pair and other new inhabitants of the Sanctuary at Hastings Park

A pair of Bald Eagles have made a new home in the Sanctuary at Hastings Park recently! The photographer, H.D. Cooper from the Environment Committee of the Hastings Park Conservancy commented:

“The Bald Eagle pair were showing off their new nest this morning. They have been constructing it since last year in a Douglas Fir at the SW corner of the Sanctuary. It has replaced the nest they occupied for a number of years across Hastings St above one of the PNE temporary parking lots. They are remarkably tolerant of noise and commotion.”

Bald Eagle Pair. The Sanctuary, Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper February 2015)

Bald Eagle Pair. The Sanctuary, Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper February 2015)

Also, “For the second year in a row, Anna’s Hummingbirds are nesting in the Sanctuary area of Hastings Park. Again, it was by good fortune that the nest was brought to my attention today by the actions of the female. It is not too far from the other, rather larger, nest of the Bald Eagle pair. The photo has a certain Where’s Waldo quality.”

Anna's Hummingbird in the nest. Sanctuary, Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper, March 2015)

Anna’s Hummingbird in the nest. Sanctuary, Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper, March 2015)

Additional sights recently photographed in the Sanctuary include Salmonberry and Flowering Red Currant in flower, “…Rufous Hummingbirds can’t be far behind.”

Salmonberry in flower. Sanctuary at Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper, March 2015)

Salmonberry in flower. Sanctuary at Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper, March 2015)

Flowering Red Currant. Sanctuary at Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper, March 2015)

Flowering Red Currant. Sanctuary at Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper, March 2015)

And, “…the new Pacific Crabapple (Malus fusca, sometimes known as Pyrus fusca) trees, obtained by the PNE as a result of consultation between Colin Priddle of the PNE and members of the Hastings Park Conservancy, were put in place. Five or six of the trees have been planted in various locations around the sanctuary. They should be in blossom in a month or so and their fruit will be a good source of nutrition for fruit-eating birds such as thrushes, waxwings and tanagers.”

The Conservancy hosts monthly guided nature walks in the Sanctuary at Hastings Park–a great opportunity to catch sight of some of these things and learn more about them!

Newly planted Pacific Crabapple tree. Sanctuary, Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper, March 2015)

Newly planted Pacific Crabapple tree. Sanctuary, Hastings Park (H.D. Cooper, March 2015)

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